Tag Archives: seascape

One to go back to

rock, beach, water, calm, sky, low tide, ripples

Rock, water, sky

It was low tide this morning when walking the dog along the beach so we went a little further than usual to where I know there are rocks and pools. This mini scene caught my eye and I was struck by the calmness of the water in this extensive but shallow pool left by the receding tide. Immediately I was thinking about a possible photographic composition but this was no more than something I might end up noting for the future – potentially one to go back to with the proper gear. All I has was my ‘phone but it’s invaluable for recording possible compositions.

This one needed a good focal point and I thought the seaweed covered rock offered a decent subject reflecting gently in the water. I felt this needed a low angle of attack so I walked into the water and crouched as low as I could to get the foreground filled with the pool and the include the sky where the cloud offered a nice “sandwich” effect with the bright horizon more or less central.

Given that this was a “scouting” shot” you might ask if it’s worth doing any processing on the phone image – yes, absolutely it is because, for me at least, it helps me see more of the potential of the composition and what I might look for in going back. Of course, anything I later do will be different, because the conditions will be different but, having gone through the full process, I have a much better idea of the possibilities.

So, I thought I would take you through the editing adjustments I made to get the final “scouting” shot above. First of all, here’s a before and after comparison to show how the image looked straight out of the phone compared to the final result:

rock, beach, water, calm, sky, low tide, ripples

before and after

All the editing was done in Lightroom and the comparison above is taken from the Lightroom Before/After function. The red area in the “before” shot is showing up as I keep highlight and shadow clipping switched on, so this is showing areas of sky that are blown out. So, where did I begin and what adjustments did I make to end up with the final “after” image?

First of all, and I pretty much always do this, is I made lens corrections and ticked to remove chromatic aberrations. After that I went into the basic menu in Lightroom and selected the auto tone option. I don’t always do this, but on this occasion I felt it would give me a decent baseline to work from. Working sequentially, I then did the following:

Exposure – dropped by about half a stop

Contrast – reduced slightly

Highlights – to deal with the blown-out area I used a brush adjustment to localise the effect only where I wanted it – in specific areas of sky

Shadows – slightly lightened

Whites – slightly lightened apart from the sky where, as part of the brush adjustment, I also dropped the whites slightly darkened

Blacks – were slightly darkened

Clarity – go carefully with this, but increased it slightly

Dehaze – as with clarity (both of these affect contrast)

Vibrance – slightly increased

I then made some colour channel adjustments, increasing the saturation of green while also adjusting it’s hue. This was to help make the rock stand out a little more as the key subject. I also made some slight adjustments to purple and magenta (hue and saturation) to bring about the effect I wanted in the sky and the sand below the water.

Finally I added a slight vignette to draw the eye towards the centre of the composition.

Having done all of that I feel this is one I might return to with the full gear even though I know it will inevitably be different. Rehearsing the whole process has encouraged me to think there is some potential here.

It also occurs to me that this shows there is much more to photography than just “taking a snap”.

 

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A journey worth going on

I think it’s generally a good idea in life not to get stuck in the same old routine and to always remain curious. That’s the essence behind this image.

Drilling rig

a telescope effect

It’s certainly not the best photo I’ve ever taken and it won’t be going into any competitions or exhibitions, but I though this was something worth sharing as a focal point.

This photo came into being as a result of curiosity and experimentation. I’m probably not the first  person to have tried this but I’d never seen any examples I could think of, so I decided to go with it once the idea had formed in my mind. I had taken the dog for an evening walk along the beach and given that it was a nice clear evening I took the binoculars out of the car to have a good look around. There are a couple of old (I presume) drilling rigs out in the Firth of Forth and I was looking at this one when I idly wondered if it was possible to use my binoculars as a hacked zoom lens for my iPhone. Well, it turned out that it is possible and the result is not as terrible as I thought it might be.

I have to admit this was all very ham-fisted as everything was hand-held; binoculars in one hand, iPhone in the other. It was then a very tricky process to line up the phone lens with one eyepiece of the binoculars and refine the positioning to achieve anything like a steady and reasonably clear image. Once I had got that, I then had the challenge of touching the phone screen to tell it where to focus and then, without losing the composition, I had to finally trigger the shutter. All of this was very difficult as the slightest movement lost the alignment and therefore the image. That’s the reason the horizon is not straight in the final image above. I decided not to make any adjustments to that as I wanted to show this as near to the reality as possible. This has had minimal processing in Lightroom, making slight adjustments to colour balance, contrast and adding in some dehaze which seemed to return a better result here than adding clarity.

As I say, this is not an image I’d do anything with but, as the result of an idle experiment, it turned out better than I thought it might. The reason I am sharing this is to encourage you to experiment with your photography – some experiments will work and maybe lead to new areas of creativity; others will not work at all, but I’d say that every experiment borne of curiosity is a journey worth going on.

 

The journey to the image

The journey to a final image has barely begun when the shutter is fired. There’s still work to be done in getting to the composition that the eye has seen and the imagination has worked with. I thought it might be worthwhile looking at that journey again with another example.

Unretouched view towards Edinburgh

Unretouched view across the Forth to Edinburgh

This is the original unretouched shot as it came out of the camera as a RAW file. I pretty much always shoot RAW so that I have the maximum data to work with in post. This was shot in the evening as dusk was falling. I shot it hand-held at 1/40 sec, ISO-200 at f/8. The reason I’m sharing those settings is that I want to explain how I was trying to find the right compromise to get a workable image. The available light was fading quite quickly as dusk fell and there was a natural haze to the light looking out across the water. I was using a focal length of 55mm so normally, to minimise camera shake, I’d want to use a shutter speed of at least 1/60 sec (the general rule of thumb is to sue a shutter speed at least as fast as the focal length – ie shooting at 30mm choose a shutter speed of at least 1/30 sec).  I was therefore shooting just a little slower than I ideally wanted and took the risk of minimal blurring from camera shake – but I thought I’d manage to be steady enough at 1/40 sec. I could have opted to widen the aperture to get a faster speed, but I wanted to have a reasonable depth of field for a landscape shot, so didn’t want to come lower than f/8. Then there was the question of ISO. I wanted to minimise grain (noise, if you prefer) so opted for ISO-200. I think I was pretty much pushing the boundaries here.

The initial RAW image (above) is rather washed-out and not as clear as it looked to the eye. My job in post was to try to get as close as possible to what I saw without making it look too heavy-handed. I did all the processing in Lightroom to end up with this:

Edinburgh from Fife

Across the Forth to Edinburgh

That’s much closer to how I saw the sky and the landscape of Edinburgh and the Pentland Hills. So, how did I get to this? Here’s a brief run down of the editing. First of all (and this is standard to my workflow) I made adjustments to the Lens Corrections and ticked to remove chromatic aberrations. I cooled the colour temperature just slightly to bring through some more of the natural blue tone. Then I added some dehaze, and clarity, trying not to overdo it. As both of those essentially affect contrast, I left the master contrast control alone. I also boosted the vibrance a little to enhance the colours and then made slight adjustments to the saturation of purple and aqua. That pretty much got me to where I wanted to be with it. Then, just to deal with the sky, I added a graduated filter and darkened it slightly. I wasn’t entirely happy with the landscape across the centre, so used a brush to add a little more dehaze to that central strand.

I envisaged this as amore cinematic shot, so cropped to a 16×9 ratio slightly recomposing to drop the horizon below the centre line. Finally, I added a slight vignette to help draw the eye in to the composition.

That, then, is how I went from the original shot to the final image. Is this a keeper? Probably not. If I go pixel-peeping, I can see some evidence of slight blurring which is probably the result of hand-holding at 1/40 sec. This wouldn’t really stand up to printing in any large scale, so I’ll put it down to a useful experiment. If I wanted to make something of this composition, I’d need to go back and re-shoot it using a tripod. Of course, whilst I could go back at the same time to the same location, the light won’t be the same and I will never be able to exactly reproduce this image. Such are the joys…

 

 

Making the most of it

I went to the seaside recently on what was a fairly calm but uninspiring day. I did have a definite plan, though. My aim was to shoot a minimalist seascape and see if I could make it interesting whilst lacking a major feature or subject within the frame.

This is what I ended up with.

beach sea and sky

deep blue

But it’s not how things began.

Here’s the original RAW file as it came out of the camera.

unedited seascape

seascape

I could see some potential in this, but as I’d been shooting towards the light, the colours are muted and the picture is pretty flat and lacking in contrast. I also felt that there are distractions here that would be better removed.

I liked the faint leading lines in the wet sand which are complemented by the small raised sandy patches helpfully pointing towards a vanishing point roughly mid-frame. Compositionally, I thought there was enough going on here to be interesting without a major subject. However, the small stalks of seaweed rising from the sand were a distraction was the drilling rig to the right of frame. I also wanted to remove the slight piece of lens flare to the left of frame. It was also clear that if this image was going to work, it needed to have a better colour treatment and some more contrast.

To achieve what I had in mind I was going to need me to work with both Lightroom and Photoshop. The danger I wanted to avoid was ending up with something that looked like it was on steroids – I wanted a natural look, so the job was more about recovering the image to something close to what I actually saw, whilst also getting rid of the distractions.

I started in Lightroom and, following my usual work flow, made the usual lens correction and ticked for removing chromatic aberration. After that I added a little dehaze to bring in some contrast before making a slight adjustment to the contrast setting itself. I find the dehaze feature more helpful with shots into the light. After that it was a case of reducing the highlights enough to prevent the left of frame area looking too thin and making a slight compensating adjustment to the overall exposure. That didn’t quite achieve what I wanted so I added a graduated filter running vertically and extending in from left of frame. Within that I made local adjustments (quite finely) for exposure and highlights.  I finished my work in Lightroom by adjusting the colour temperature to cool it a little and bring back some of the blue. I also slightly adjusted the saturation of blue and aqua in the HSL setting, adjusting for both hue and saturation. All of this with the lightest touch I felt I could get away with to achieve the effect I wanted.

Then it was over to Photoshop to deal with the distractions. After making a duplicate layer to work on, I removed the distractions I wanted by first using the content aware fill and then refining where necessary with a little cloning. Finally, I ran a high pass to sharpen the overall image.

In the end, I am happy with what I finally produced. I think I managed to achieve something very close to what I saw with my eyes on location. In short, I think I managed to make the most of it.

Evening glow

Another piece of serendipity today which just goes to show the value of keeping a camera handy and being alert to the opportunities. This shot was not planned at all. I was in Lundin Links for another purpose and was ready to leave but a traffic accident meant I could not get out of the car park. So, I got my camera kit backpack out of the car and set off for a walk to pass the time. 

This view met me from behind the clubhouse at Lundin Golf Club. As the sun was setting the golden glow made for a nice warm looking sky nicely picking out the clouds. The view is across Largo Bay. The wind turbine generators sit on the site of the old coal fired Methil power station and now stand like clean energy sentinels in contrast to the chimney and generator building of old. Across to the left of the shot are the Pentland Hills just south of Edinburgh. The arrangement of water, land, sky and lighting really appealed to me and, once again, was pleased to have my camera handy.

This was shot in RAW and minimally processed for highlights and contrast – I’ll probably do some more fine tuning when I get back to base and can see this in Lightroom, but it’s likely to be with the lightest of touches.

I/800sec at f5.6 on ISO 20o

Travel retrospective 11 – paddling home

Paddling home

Fisherman

This was shot during a visit to the Indonesian island of Nias in December 2006. It was an extremely hot day and in a break from filming on the beach I had gone for shelter higher up the shore which gave me enough height to spot this lone fisherman making his way back to shore.

I was struck by the effort of paddling back home and the pose of this fisherman seems to capture that. I think the effort is made more visible by the contrast and silhouette created by the contre-jour lighting. When this fisherman had hauled his boat ashore with the help of a friend, I wandered down to see the extent of his catch; a mere three fish. I was struck by realisation of the amount of effort it takes for many people in the world today to scratch out a living and this photo always reminds me of that.

The photo was shot using a Nikon D70s at 1/640 sec on ISO-400 with an aperture of f14 and a focal length of 300mm. The original photograph was in colour and has been converted to mono in Lightroom with minor adjustments to tone and contrast.

 

Traces of presence

Traces of presence

Footprints

Is it possible to have a favourite photograph? This is a question I have been pondering as I work on my personal photo book for 2014; a collection of images that hold personal memories from the year.

As is the case with my taste in music, the concept of “favourite” has a temporary nature and often depends on the mood of the moment. Choosing a favourite image from 2014 became a challenge and as I browsed through the year’s catalogue of photos I began to find it a very difficult one. There were simply too many options from family, to creative images, to places visited. I finally gave up on the idea of a favourite and settled on choosing an image that spoke to me in a meaningful way. And this is the one I chose.

I like its simplicity and the way it captures a range of colour from the warm tones of the sand to the cool blues and whites of the sea and sky. Many of my landscape images have a clear uninterrupted horizon and I think this is a reflection of the fact that my preference is for open spaces where I can simply “be” and feel a connection with creation which I find is blocked out by the busyness of modern life.

For me, however, the most striking feature of this photo are the footprints on the sand which emerge from the sea. In one moment, they evoke a sense of arrival, presence and passing. They are a reminder that we leave traces of ourselves as we journey through life and that we ought to aim to leave positive traces wherever possible. These footprints in the sand also remind me of Genesis 3: 8, 9 where it tells of God walking in the garden in the cool of the day. I know a beach is not exactly a garden, but equally the garden of Eden is a concept rather than some classically formal 17th century horticultural setting. Adam and Eve heard God walking in the cool of the day and decided to hide as they had disobeyed him. So, for me, this image carries a sense of comfort; the footprints representing God’s unseen presence with us. It also, however, serves as a reminder that we cannot hide from truth as we leave echoes of ourselves wherever we go and that’s not a bad thought for Christmas.

The photograph was taken on the Kintyre peninsula in Scotland and was shot at 1/320 sec at f18 on a focal length of 29mm.