Tag Archives: wildlife

Be prepared … …for the unexpected

This morning when preparing to go out for the early dog walk I decided to go down by the river as I’d passed a heron recently on that route, standing barely 15 metres away in still water. I didn’t have a camera on that occasion – today was going to be different.

Of course, having the camera along meant that I didn’t see the heron but what I did get was completely unexpected:

a pair of deer

Deer

a pair of deer standing in a grassy clearing beside a stand of trees.

My preparation for something I had anticipated allowed  me to get this shot with the minimum of fuss and was taken within seconds of spotting the deer.  Apart from taking the camera along, how had I prepared and how had that prepared me for the unexpected? Let me explain…

All of my preparation was for seeing the heron, but that also perfectly suited the scenario that I faced here. Before I left home I put on a 55-200mm lens and also fitted the sling harness to the camera allowing me to carry it securely across my body but readily available to pull up and take the shot. As I anticipated that the heron could quickly take off I needed to be ready with a shutter speed fast enough to catch the action and avoid any motion blur from camera shake. I also wanted to have an aperture that would give me a safe depth of field to make sure focus should be OK. I set the camera to manual mode and opted for 1/400sec at f/8. All well and good, but what about ISO? My camera has the option to set ISO to automatic, which is what I did. That way, I can shoot with my preferred shutter speed and aperture and allow the camera to determine the ideal exposure by adjusting the ISO. I find that using evaluative metering tends to work well with this, though I almost always need to make some exposure adjustment in Lightroom.

Therefore, being prepared to shoot the heron, I was also happily prepared for this unexpected sighting of deer. All I had to do was lift the camera, switching it on as I did so, quickly frame the basic composition and shoot. All done within a few seconds. I’m not a wildlife photographer but I do know that it generally doesn’t give you time to set up and carefully consider what settings to go for – being prepared is the key.

Having got that photo, I spotted that there was some cow parsley (I think) just a pace pace or two in front of me. I thought that a shot taken through that would provide an interesting foreground bokeh. As I crouched to frame the shot the deer became nervous and made a bolt for it so I just pressed the shutter release as I was also moving . Here’s the resulting shot:

deer on the run

and we’re off…

It’s not the greatest wildlife shot ever as all the movement that was going on has combined to result in a less than sharp image, but I wanted to demonstrate the bokeh effect that I was wanting – only with stationary deer!

And here is what I shot through for the image above; the gap just right of centre…

cow parsley

Cow parsley

Keep those shutters firing, look out for the unusual and be prepared for the unexpected.

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Getting a bonus shot

Today I set out to explore the landscape on the Falkland Estate where I’d heard there was a waterfall you could actually walk behind.  Sure enough, after getting directions from an information point and a hike uphill, I found the Yad Waterfall.

waterfall, water, cascade, smooth, landscape, nature

The Yad Waterfall

This was too good to miss, so I was pleased to have taken the camera bag and tripod on what was just going to be a recce. It was very quiet and I had planned that if I found the waterfall I would go for a long exposure to soften the water. This was achieved using an ND filter and shooting on ISO 100 at f11. Some gentle editing in Lightroom gave me a couple of final images I am pleased with.

waterfall, water, landscape, nature, softened, smooth

Yad Waterfall

Feeling pleased with what looked like a potentially good outcome from this little trip, I headed back down to have some alfresco lunch at The Pillars of Hercules where I was joined by an unexpected guest.

robin, bird, nature, wildlife

Robin

This little robin was extremely bold and nearly got onto the plate with my toastie. Still, he made for a good model and a bonus shot for the day.

 

 

The art of preparation

Sometimes you get lucky – the trick is to be ready for it.

Heron by the river

Heron

First the disclaimer – I am not a wildlife photographer for two principle reasons:

  1. I don’t have the infinite patience it needs
  2. I don’t have the specialised kit for it

So, with that out of the way, on with the story.

This morning I decided to walk the dog along the river. The last time I was there, two days ago, I saw one heron and three deer. I decided, therefore, to pop the 200mm zoom lens on the camera before I went out, just in case. We’d walked well past where I saw the heron last time and my hopes were fading when I spotted it immediately across the river, no more than 15 metres away and well within range for my lens. Slowly and steadily, making as little movement as possible I began to lift my camera up, at which point it took off and flew away downstream. Perhaps my bright red mountain jacket had something to do with it – another reason I am not a wildlife photographer. I watched it fly low down the river and suspected it had landed not too far away. I therefore kept my camera on and up at the ready. Then I spotted it again, about 50 metres distant on the far bank. This time I stopped and took a shot from where I was before slowly edging forward hoping for a better opportunity. After twenty paces or so, it spotted the red mountain jacket again, and took to the air. This time I was ready, had the camera to my eye and followed it, getting the following shot.

Heron in flight

In flight

Although both of these shots were opportunistic, I had prepared for the opportunity. Not only did I have my camera with me, I had also decided to maximise my chances of a clear and successful shot by setting up in a way that I thought would work. I knew I would be shooting hand held so wanted to have a short enough exposure to overcome any camera shake and to freeze action. I also wanted to shoot around the sweet spot of the lens (between f8 and f11 for the one I was using). I therefore opted to work in manual mode, setting the shutter speed at 1/1000 sec and the aperture at f8. I then set the camera on auto ISO so that I would be pretty much guaranteed a good exposure. I also set the metering to spot, aiming to keep the subject centre frame with the intention that I would crop in and recompose in post – which is what I did with both images.

It’s pleasing that my preparation was rewarded on this occasion, despite the bright red mountain jacket.

A little further along the walk, and feeling optimistic about having grabbed a couple of decent shots I turned to look behind me and was struck by the way the marsh grasses and trees looked in the sunlight.

Grasses and trees

Impenetrable

I’m still not sure quite why I like this shot but I was fascinated by the patterns created by the light on the boughs and branches, the resulting contrast and the apparent randomness of the patterns. This too is cropped in post to achieve the composition I envisaged at the time I took the shot. I also heavily desaturated the image, not quite fully, and added a slight colour cast just to help the mood. I like to think of this one as my bonus shot from the morning dog walk and the great thing is that landscape is not startled by a red mountain jacket so stays put while you take time to compose the shot; a whole lot more co-operative.

A success

Peacock display

Peacock display

This photograph is from my successful portfolio submission for the Licentiate of The Royal Photographic Society. I submitted a portfolio of ten photographs for the panel which were taken in a variety of locations both in the UK and abroad, including Thailand and D R Congo. The photograph of the peacock was taken in June 2012 at Scone Palace near Perth and was an opportunistic shot grabbed quickly in the moment. Other photographs in my portfolio were more planned and considered.

The Society’s distinctions are internationally respected and sought-after by professional and amateur photographers. Over 1,000 applications for Licentiateship, Associateship and Fellowship are received each year with around 600 being successful. Submissions are held in different categories and are assessed by a qualified Panel of senior members of The Society. The Society takes great care in maintaining standards and in promoting excellence among photographers.

Royal Photographic Society is an educational charity with a Royal Charter, It was founded in 1853 “to promote the Art and Science of Photography”. Membership is open to everyone and The Society is the UK’s largest organisation representing photographers with over 10,000 members in the UK and abroad.The Society’s world-class Collection of historic photographs, equipment and library is housed for the nation at the National Media Museum, Bradford.

For more information visit www.rps.org

See my successful LRPS portfolio here